Do you suffer from Leaky Gut ?

Leaky Gut

Do You Know About Leaky Gut And The Threat It Means For Your Immune System?

We can easily identify where our nervous, digestive or cardiovascular systems are in our body but… What about our immune system? 

Now you know 70% of it lies in the gut, making it the immune system’s powerhouse. And if you think about it, it’s no wonder why: Our food nourishes our body, but it’s also our main source of harmful bacteria and toxins.  Recent research shows there’s a direct link between our western diet and a generalized state of inflammation, which affects our immune response.

Our gut is like a sift that separates nutrients from waste, filtering the nutrients to the bloodstream and eliminating the rest. The standard western diet: high in carbs and fats and low in fiber, combined with other elements like alcohol and stress, can harm our gut. This can cause your gut to rip: harbouring pathogenic bacteria and leaking toxins to the bloodstream. This condition is known as:

Leaky Gut

Which we’re all affected by in different levels .

No one wants toxins from their undigested food products, faeces and bacteria to leak into their bloodstream, so you might be wondering… 

Leaky Gut Syndrome

What Are The Symptoms Of Leaky Gut?

Leaky gut manifests differently for everyone, depending on the weakest links in their health. Note that you do not need to have any digestive symptoms to have a leaky gut. Leaky gut can manifest as or worsen the following conditions:

  • Autoimmune
  • Joint pain
  • Food allergies, intolerances, and sensitivities
    High cholesterol
  • Brain fog and cognitive decline
  • Inability to lose weight or keep it off 
  • Low Mood and mental health problems
    Skin problems
  • Digestive diseases and symptoms
  • Fatigue
  • Allergic diseases

What Are The Causes Of Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Many things in the modern diet and lifestyle can increase intestinal permeability, such as:

  • Unhealthy diets and processed foods that are high in trans, saturated fats , sugar, and food texturizers
  • Gluten
    Nutrient deficiencies, especially vitamins A and D
  • Alcohol
    Gut infections, such as parasites and yeasts
  • Inflammation from food
  • Stress and traumatic events
  • Hard workouts
  • Concussions and brain injuries
  • Poor sleep and circadian rhythm
  • Dysbiosis or imbalances of the gut microbes
  • Medications, such as ibuprofens, antibiotics, birth control, and proton-pump inhibitors
  • Genetic susceptibilities may contribute to the tendency to develop leaky gut syndrome

Leaky Gut Syndrome Article

Leaky gut is a symptom rather than a condition. But, confusingly, it’s a symptom that can contribute to other conditions. These can be within the digestive system and may include:

· Food allergies and/or sensitivities
· Inflammatory bowel disease
· IBS
· Coeliac disease

They can also be outside the digestive, such as:

· Chronic fatigue syndrome
· Fibromyalgia
· Depression
· Obesity
· PCOS
· Rheumatoid arthritis
· Type-1 diabetes

Doctors don’t know whether leaky gut is driving these conditions or if it’s the other way around—but research suggests they’re connected. If you experience any of the above, it’s worth testing to see if leaky gut is related to your symptoms.

At present, the NHS doesn’t test for leaky gut. This is likely because it doesn’t recognise leaky gut as a condition.

The Root Cause of Leaky Gut Symptoms and Poor Digestion:

A Rogue Protein Punching “Holes” Along Your Gut Wall… Allowing Destructive Bacteria To Flood Your Gut and Disrupt Your Gut Biome Equilibrium

What we found is a rogue gut protein called Zonulin.

Now – when your gut is functioning normally, Zonulin offers important protection to the body.

If you accidentally eat food contaminated with salmonella, Zonulin temporarily opens your gut wall to allow water in and trigger diarrhoea to flush out the bugs.[10]

But unfortunately, due to modern foods laced with contaminants… Zonulin has gone rogue.

Contaminants keep Zonulin levels high in the gut, where it widens the gut lining to allow fluids in – allowing toxins, contaminants, and destructive bacteria to flood your gut.

What Is The Best Supplement For Leaky Gut Syndrome (LGS)?

Most people who try to heal their leaky gut will use some antimicrobials, probiotics, digestive enzymes and sometimes a chemical biofilm breaker. Some protocols will also include glutamine or bone broth to “feed” the gut cells. The problems with this approach include:

  • It doesn’t take into account how your gut bacteria interact with your gut lining. Antimicrobials and biofilm breakers are not specific to the bad bacteria or yeast, thus killing both good and bad bacteria. This can create more dysbiosis.
  • The killing spree and biofilm breaking can result in unpleasant dieoff reactions from these microbes and biofilm releasing inflammatory substances. Sometimes, the antimicrobials can even turn the microbes more aggressive.
  • The probiotics are not specifically designed to stay or provide the fuel to survive.
  • Buying 5 supplements for a few months gets expensive.
  • Leaky Gut Guardian is designed and tested to only attack the bad bacteria, while leaving the good bacteria intact. Studies have also shown that IgY can disrupt the communication  (quorum sensing) and biofilm formation between bad bacteria. Also, after the disruptions, the IgY binds to these bacteria and helps the white blood cells to destroy them, which minimizes dieoff clinical study has also shown that IgYmax can increase the beneficial bacteria, and reduce intestinal permeability and inflammation markers.
  • Leaky Gut Guardian combines IgY max with friendly Lactobacilli that are better at adhering to the gut lining than most probiotic strains. We also provide prebiotics that improve their survival. Also, the prebiotic fermentation can produce butyrate and other short-chain fatty acids, which feed and improve the gut lining. The bone broth and collagen powders also provide the nutrients to support the gut lining.
  • Overall, Leaky Gut Guardian is the only gut healing supplement that works to weed out the bad bacteria and reseed the good ones, while supporting the gut lining. It is the most powerful leaky gut healing supplement in combination with a healthy diet and lifestyle.

Introducing... LEAKY GUT GUARDIAN ®

Repairs Your Intestinal Lining,
Eliminates Destructive Bacteria and
Boosts Your Immune System… BIG TIME

Leaky Gut Guardian Chocolate

Leaky Gut Guardian® – CHOCOLATE

£59.99 – £109.99

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Leaky Gut Guardian® – VANILLA

£59.99 – £109.99

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Leaky Gut Guardian is one of the best-tasting superfood supplements ever formulated with 2 Incredible Flavours To Fit Your Needs

Leaky Gut Guardian

AND ITS 3-STEP IMMUNE BOOSTING SPECTRE

Component

CLEANSE & ACTIVATE IMMUNE RESPONSE

With a combination of the best probiotic bacteria strains that help to eliminate the bad crawlies already living in our gut. Containing Lactobacillus rhamnosusLactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus helveticus, clinically proven to fight pathogenic bacteria and enhance immune response.

Component

CLEANSE & ACTIVATE IMMUNE RESPONSE

Leaky Gut Guardian contains IgY MAX, the only patented egg-based immunoglobulin. Immunoglobulins are naturally occurring cells that our body generates to fight bad bacteria and the toxins they produce. By eliminating these threats, our body can regenerate the gut tissue and reduce its permeability. IgY MAX has proven to reduce gut permeability up to 95% in human research Having better gut health allows better nutrient absorption. 

Component

NOURISH & MAINTAIN GASTRIC HEALTH

Prebiotics are nutrients that our body can’t absorb, but good bacteria in your gut can. This helps to keep the good bacteria we’ve fed our body stay nourished and healthy. Leaky Gut Guardian contains InulinD-ribose and VitaFiber. These prebiotics not only feed our healthy microbiome, but have also proven to further strengthen the immune system, Increase our cellular energy and improve overall gastric health.

We wanted to make this the best gut-immunity formula ever created, so we added even more to it, starting with…

3 of the Most Powerful Gut Immunity Enhancing Probiotic Strains Ever Discovered

Our team developed a way to culture these probiotics in the exact levels needed to speed up the gut-repair process and optimize the ratio of good-to-bad bacteria in your gut.

In every serving of Leaky Gut Guardian, you get 10 billion CFU of:

LACTOBACILLUS RHAMNOSUS

Native to the human gut, it can assist in recovery from gastrointestinal issues and create overall gut balance.

LACTOBACILLUS RHAMNOSUS

L. rhamnosus may prevent gastrointestinal infections and diarrhoea. In one study, it was also shown to reduce the risk of acquiring gastrointestinal infections when administered daily.

Consumption of L. rhamnosus reduced the occurrence of respiratory illness in children attending day care centres.

Children receiving L. rhamnosus had fewer days with respiratory symptoms per month than children in the control group.

L. rhamnosus was shown to protect hospitalized patients against ventilator-associated pneumonia, mainly when caused by a specific pathogen.

LACTOBACILLUS GASSERI

This probiotic recently gained popularity due to reports of weight loss and decreased blood sugar. As you’ll see below, it also has profound implications for gut health and immunity.

LACTOBACILLUS GASSERI

L. gasseri significantly decreased BMI, abdominal visceral fat, waist and hip circumferences, and body fat mass in healthy adults, with an 8.5% decline in abdominal fat over twelve weeks.

Prevented abdominal fat accumulation and decreases body weight in adults with obese tendencies.

L. gasseri enhanced immunity in the elderly. This probiotic can increase the number of T cells.

Last but not least, it beneficially modified the microbiota (gut flora), increasing Bifidobacteria and decreasing Clostridium in human subjects.

LACTOBACILLUS HELVETICUS

Increasingly recognized as an essential, health-promoting probiotic that can help bring about favorable gut balance.

LACTOBACILLUS HELVETICUS

In a study of 39 athletes, L. helveticus significantly shortened the duration and decreased the number of symptoms of upper respiratory tract illness and increased their sense of vigour.

It may positively affect the host gut microbiome composition. Administration of L. helveticus in one study resulted in a significant increase in butyrate, beneficial for gut homeostasis.

And lastly, scientists found that milk fermented with L. helveticus may enhance specific and nonspecific immunity.

We wanted to make this the best gut-immunity formula ever created, so we added even more to it, starting with…

3 of the Most Powerful Gut Immunity Enhancing Probiotic Strains Ever Discovered

Our team developed a way to culture these probiotics in the exact levels needed to speed up the gut-repair process and optimize the ratio of good-to-bad bacteria in your gut.

In every serving of Leaky Gut Guardian, you get 10 billion CFU of:

LACTOBACILLUS RHAMNOSUS

L. rhamnosus may prevent gastrointestinal infections and diarrhoea. In one study, it was also shown to reduce the risk of acquiring gastrointestinal infections when administered daily.

Consumption of L. rhamnosus reduced the occurrence of respiratory illness in children attending day care centres.

Children receiving L. rhamnosus had fewer days with respiratory symptoms per month than children in the control group.

L. rhamnosus was shown to protect hospitalized patients against ventilator-associated pneumonia, mainly when caused by a specific pathogen.

LACTOBACILLUS GASSERI

L. gasseri significantly decreased BMI, abdominal visceral fat, waist and hip circumferences, and body fat mass in healthy adults, with an 8.5% decline in abdominal fat over twelve weeks.

Prevented abdominal fat accumulation and decreases body weight in adults with obese tendencies.

L. gasseri enhanced immunity in the elderly. This probiotic can increase the number of T cells.

Last but not least, it beneficially modified the microbiota (gut flora), increasing Bifidobacteria and decreasing Clostridium in human subjects.

LACTOBACILLUS HELVETICUS

In a study of 39 athletes, L. helveticus significantly shortened the duration and decreased the number of symptoms of upper respiratory tract illness and increased their sense of vigour.

It may positively affect the host gut microbiome composition. Administration of L. helveticus in one study resulted in a significant increase in butyrate, beneficial for gut homeostasis.

And lastly, scientists found that milk fermented with L. helveticus may enhance specific and nonspecific immunity.
Leaky Gut Guardian Chocolate

Leaky Gut Guardian® – CHOCOLATE

£59.99 – £109.99

Clear

Leaky Gut Guardian® – VANILLA

£59.99 – £109.99

Clear

Leaky Gut Guardian is one of the best-tasting superfood supplements ever formulated with 2 Incredible Flavours To Fit Your Needs

The Benefits of Leaky Gut Guardian Supplement Backed by Science

BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM WITH THE POWER OF PROBIOTICS, PREBIOTICS AND IMMUNOGLOBULINS

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2 Christ A, Lauterbach M, Latz E. Western diet and the immune system: An inflammatory connection. Immunity. 2019;51(5):794-811. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2019.09.020

3 Campos M. Leaky gut: What is it, and what does it mean for you? Harvard.edu. Published September 22, 2017. Accessed June 3, 2021. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/leaky-gut-what-is-it-and-what-does-it-mean-for-you-2017092212451

4 Segers ME, Lebeer S. Towards a better understanding of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG–host interactions. Microb Cell Fact. 2014;13 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):S7. doi: 10.1186/1475-2859-13-S1-S7

5 Nishihira J, Nishimura M, Moriya T, Sakai F, Kabuki T, Kawasaki Y. Lactobacillus Gasseri Potentiates Immune Response Against Influenza Virus Infection. In: Chatterjee S, Jungraithmayr W, Bagchi D, eds. Immunity and Inflammation in Health and Disease. Elsevier; 2018:249-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805417-8.00020-2

6 Taverniti V, Stuknyte M, Minuzzo M, et al. S-layer protein mediates the stimulatory effect of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 on innate immunity. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013;79(4):1221-1231. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03056-12

7 Shin J-H, Yang M, Nam SW, et al. Use of egg yolk-derived immunoglobulin as an alternative to antibiotic treatment for control of Helicobacter pylori infection. lin Vaccine Immunol. 2002;9(5):1061-1066. https://doi.org/10.1128/CDLI.9.5.1061-1066.2002.

8 Watzl B, Girrbach S, Roller M. Inulin, oligofructose and immunomodulation. Br J Nutr. 2005;93 Suppl 1:S49-55. doi:10.1079/bjn20041357

9 Mahoney DE, Hiebert JB, Thimmesch A, et al. Understanding D-Ribose and Mitochondrial Function. Adv Biosci Clin Med. 2018;6(1):1.

10 Singh RD, Banerjee J, Arora A. Prebiotic potential of oligosaccharides: A focus on xylan derived oligosaccharides. Bioact carbohydr diet fibre. 2015;5(1):19-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bcdf.2014.11.003

11 Xu FX, Xu YP, Jin LJ, et al. Effectiveness of egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) against periodontal disease-causing Fusobacterium nucleatum. J Appl Microbiol. 2012;113(4):983-991.

12 Thomsen K, Christophersen L, Bjarnsholt T, Jensen PØ, Moser C, Høiby N. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies induce specific bacterial aggregation and internalization in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Infect Immun. 2015;83(7):2686-2693.

13 Frasca G, Cardile V, Puglia C, Bonina C, Bonina F. Gelatin tannate reduces the proinflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide in human intestinal epithelial cells. Clin Exp Gastroenterol. 2012;5:61-67. https://doi.org/10.2147/CEG.S28792

14 Chen Q, Chen O, Martins IM, et al.Collagen peptides ameliorate intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction in immunostimulatory Caco-2 cell monolayers via enhancing tight junctions. Food Funct. 2017;8(3):1144-1151 https://doi.org/10.1039/C6FO01347C

15 Fasano A. All disease begins in the (leaky) gut: role of zonulin-mediated gut permeability in the pathogenesis of some chronic inflammatory diseases. F1000Res. 2020;9:69.c

16 Fasano A. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012;42(1):71-78.

17 Szychlinska MA, Di Rosa M, Castorina A, Mobasheri A, Musumeci G. A correlation between intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and osteoarthritis. Heliyon. 2019;5(1):e01134.

18 Yu LC-H. Intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction in food hypersensitivity. J Allergy (Cairo). 2012;2012:596081.

19 Neves AL, Coelho J, Couto L, Leite-Moreira A, Roncon-Albuquerque R Jr. Metabolic endotoxemia: a molecular link between obesity and cardiovascular risk. J Mol Endocrinol. 2013;51(2):R51-64.

20 André P, Laugerette F, Féart C.Metabolic endotoxemia: A potential underlying mechanism of the relationship between dietary fat intake and risk for cognitive impairments in humans? Nutrients. 2019;11(8):1887.

21 Clapp M, Aurora N, Herrera L, Bhatia M, Wilen E, Wakefield S. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. Clin Pract. 2017;7(4):987.

22 Salem I, Ramser A, Isham N, Ghannoum MA.The gut microbiome as a major regulator of the gut-skin axis. Front Microbiol. 2018;9:1459.

23 Bischoff SC, Barbara G, Buurman W, et al. Intestinal permeability–a new target for disease prevention and therapy. BMC Gastroenterol. 2014;14(1):189.

24 Maes M, Coucke F, Leunis J-C. Normalization of the increased translocation of endotoxin from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) is accompanied by a remission of chronic fatigue syndrome. Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2007;28(6):739-744

25 Lerner A, Matthias T. Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease. Autoimmun Rev. 2015;14(6):479-489.

26 Rohr MW, Narasimhulu CA, Rudeski-Rohr TA, Parthasarathy S. Negative effects of a high-fat diet on intestinal permeability: A review. Adv Nutr. 2020;11(1):77-91.

27 Fasano A. onulin, regulation of tight junctions, and autoimmune diseases: Zonulin, regulation of tight junctions. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2012;1258(1):25-33.

28 Bishehsari F, Magno E, Swanson G, et al. Alcohol and gut-derived inflammation. Alcohol Res. 2017;38(2):163-171.

29 Mohammadi R, Hosseini-Safa A, Ehsani Ardakani MJ, Rostami-Nejad M. The relationship between intestinal parasites and some immune-mediated intestinal conditions. Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench. 2015;8(2):123-131.

30 Rapin JR, Wiernsperger N. Possible links between intestinal permeability and food processing: A potential therapeutic niche for glutamine. Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2010;65(6):635-643.

31 Vanuytsel T, van Wanrooy S, Vanheel H, et al. Psychological stress and corticotropin-releasing hormone increase intestinal permeability in humans by a mast cell-dependent mechanism. Gut. 2014;63(8):1293-1299.

32 Clark A, Mach N. Exercise-induced stress behavior, gut-microbiota-brain axis and diet: a systematic review for athletes. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2016;13(1):43.

33 Bansal V, Costantini T, Kroll L, et al. Traumatic brain injury and intestinal dysfunction: uncovering the neuro-enteric axis. J Neurotrauma. 2009;26(8):1353-1359.

34 Li Y, Hao Y, Fan F, Zhang B. The role of microbiome in insomnia, circadian disturbance and depression. Front Psychiatry. 2018;9:669.

35 Immune response. 2021. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Medline Plus.

36 Brian EL. The concept of depression as a dysfunction of the immune system. Current Immunology Reviews (Discontinued). 2010;6(3):205-212. doi:10.2174/157339510791823835

37 Chunxi L, Haiyue L, Yanxia L, Jianbing P, Jin S. The gut Microbiota and respiratory diseases: New evidence. J Immunol Res. 2020;2020:2340670. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/2340670.

38 Morris G, Berk M, Carvalho AF, Caso JR, Sanz Y, Maes M. The role of Microbiota and intestinal permeability in the pathophysiology of autoimmune and neuroimmune processes with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease Type 1 diabetes and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Curr Pharm Des. 2016;22(40):6058-6075.

39 Myers A. 5 Medications that Can Cause Leaky Gut. Published January 29th, 2018. Accessed June 8, 2021. https://www.amymyersmd.com/article/medications-cause-leaky-gut/

40 Barbuzano J. Understanding how the intestine replaces and repairs itself. Harvard Gazette. Published July 14, 2017. Accessed June 8, 2021. https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2017/07/understanding-how-the-intestine-replaces-and-repairs-itself/

41 Anderson J. Digestive system recovery after celiac disease. Verywellhealth.com. Accessed June 8, 2021. https://www.verywellhealth.com/celiac-disease-when-will-your-small-intestine-recover-562341

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